Start with the ending

In addition to being one of my favorite David Wilcox songs, this is also how I feel about any big project.  Mission statements are important because they serve as a roadmap to where you want to go.  Our school garden has had one for a long time, and I return to it all the time, but just yesterday we finished a project to have it printed on a sign and hung in the garden for all to see.

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And just in time for this Saturday’s 2nd Annual Julian Garden Tour!  If you’re in Southern California, consider coming up for the day.  Seven gardens are on display, including the school garden, from 10-4.  Tickets, which are the maps to and the descriptions of the gardens, are $20 and can be bought at Town Hall on Main Street or Julian Elementary on the day of the event.  All proceeds benefit the district’s Farm to School efforts.

Thank you to Leslie and Brian at Wet Duck Design for creating and installing our sign!

 

 

The whole story in 8 minutes

Recently I made this imovie about the entire garden project for a grant proposal.  I think it tells the story quite succinctly, and I hope you’ll enjoy it!  (By the way, it has been a HUGE week in the garden with lots of great stories to tell but I’ll have to wait to recover from it all to tell them.  Good stuff coming!)

Take it outside!

“Taking learning outside”—a phrase I’ve heard from those in the environmental education/school garden world.  The idea is this: if you can teach it in the classroom, you can teach it outside.  (Agree? Disagree? Discuss.)

Here are some ways non-garden activities have moved into the garden in the last year:

On Science Day, students met in the garden with the amazing naturalist/teacher Kat to pound and braid yucca fibers into rope:

Girl Scouts held their “bridging ceremony” during which they pass to the next level of scouting:

An Easter Egg hunt last April:

Yoga class:

A kindergarten teacher uses the garden with a yearly unit on the gingerbread man!

And finally, “reading buddies” (third graders paired with first graders) and SSR (“silent sustained reading”). Do they still use that term?  I remember reading at my desk, but I would have loved to have read in a silent, sustained way in a gazebo!

Honeysuckle teepee

With its little cushion, our honeysuckle teepee beckons children to come and sit.  Many days there is a child inside, absorbed in a book.  I believe childrens’ gardens should have elements of whimsy and beauty that invite little people to crawl in, relax and imagine.

 

Thank you Heather for creating this beloved teepee in the early days of the garden.