Garden Tour: May 2013

Time to wander around the school garden.  Join me.

Let’s start with the roses.

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When the breeze is blowing, and you get a waft of honeysuckle flowers, it’s a little bit of heaven.

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Another 3×3 square foot gardening model, with the pvc criss-cross hoop.  Planted with kale, swiss chard, peppers and marigolds.

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Gazebo windowboxes planted with flowers purchased at the Warners Springs Mother’s Day plant sale as well as plants I scored for free at the end of Master Gardener Spring Seminar.

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Also new to the gazebo, an inhabited bird nest in the rafters!

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Peas, glorious peas.

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GARDEN FAIL.  We planted this out with three varieties of spinach, which barely sprouted then turned yellow, despite babying.  Keepin’ it humble, in the garden.

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Sidewalk art adjacent to the garden.

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We took our artist-made solar fountain inside for the winter so that it wouldn’t crack in the low temperatures.  It’s now back home, though in a different location—closer to the habitat bed.

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Looks like we may have our first crop of grapes when school resumes.

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Kat Beck introducing the preview films in order to introduce the Wild and Scenic Film Festival at an all-school assembly.  After watching “Watermelon Magic,” we’ve witnessed students standing over plants and whispering, “grow, grow, grow!”

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Lastly, giving Backcountry Collaborative partner awards, I got to gush about my Garden Beneficials and University of Wednesday parent helpers.  I made the point: not only do they do A LOT of work in the garden, but they also love the garden with me.  I am grateful for both.

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Honeysuckle teepee

With its little cushion, our honeysuckle teepee beckons children to come and sit.  Many days there is a child inside, absorbed in a book.  I believe childrens’ gardens should have elements of whimsy and beauty that invite little people to crawl in, relax and imagine.

 

Thank you Heather for creating this beloved teepee in the early days of the garden.